Determination of the bioavailability of selected pharmaceutical residues in fish plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry

Publication date: 3 November 2017
Source:Journal of Chromatography A, Volume 1522
Author(s): S. Poirier Larabie, M. Houde, C. Gagnon
Aquatic systems near major urban centers are constantly contaminated with effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Pharmaceuticals are part of the contamination and several classes of drugs have been detected in surface waters in the last decade. To better understand the impact of those pharmaceuticals in ecosystems, the exposure to aquatic species needs to be investigated. This study presents a new simple and rugged quantitative method for the determination of several classes of drugs using 100μL of plasma from fish environmentally exposed to a major but highly diluted urban effluent. Six common drugs (i.e., diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, salbutamol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) and one major metabolite (2-hydroxy-ibuprofen), present in significant amount in impacted waterways have been selected for the development and validation of the method. First, all drugs were extracted using cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) and eluted with two solvent mixtures. Then, the extracts were analyzed using a reverse-phase analytical column Waters® CORTECS C18+ (150×2.1mm, 2.7μm) within 14min. MS/MS was performed with an electrospray (ESI) interface in positive ion mode, with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiment acquiring two product ions per drugs. Quantification has been made with standard curves for each analyte using isotopically labeled internal standards. This method has high sensitivity with limits of quantification of 1ngmL−1 for each drug, except for ibuprofen and its metabolite 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen at 2ngmL−1. The precision of the method was below 11%, the accuracy between 94 and 105% and overall recovery between 94 and 111% for all drugs, with high selectivity. Application of the method to plasma samples from wild northern pike inhabiting the St. Lawrence River collected over a three-year period showed the presence of naproxen, diclofenac, trimethoprim and salbutamol at very low concentrations (around 1ngmL−1).

Publication date: 3 November 2017
Source:Journal of Chromatography A, Volume 1522

Author(s): S. Poirier Larabie, M. Houde, C. Gagnon

Aquatic systems near major urban centers are constantly contaminated with effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Pharmaceuticals are part of the contamination and several classes of drugs have been detected in surface waters in the last decade. To better understand the impact of those pharmaceuticals in ecosystems, the exposure to aquatic species needs to be investigated. This study presents a new simple and rugged quantitative method for the determination of several classes of drugs using 100μL of plasma from fish environmentally exposed to a major but highly diluted urban effluent. Six common drugs (i.e., diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, salbutamol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) and one major metabolite (2-hydroxy-ibuprofen), present in significant amount in impacted waterways have been selected for the development and validation of the method. First, all drugs were extracted using cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) and eluted with two solvent mixtures. Then, the extracts were analyzed using a reverse-phase analytical column Waters® CORTECS C18+ (150×2.1mm, 2.7μm) within 14min. MS/MS was performed with an electrospray (ESI) interface in positive ion mode, with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiment acquiring two product ions per drugs. Quantification has been made with standard curves for each analyte using isotopically labeled internal standards. This method has high sensitivity with limits of quantification of 1ngmL−1 for each drug, except for ibuprofen and its metabolite 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen at 2ngmL−1. The precision of the method was below 11%, the accuracy between 94 and 105% and overall recovery between 94 and 111% for all drugs, with high selectivity. Application of the method to plasma samples from wild northern pike inhabiting the St. Lawrence River collected over a three-year period showed the presence of naproxen, diclofenac, trimethoprim and salbutamol at very low concentrations (around 1ngmL−1).