Different in vitro Cellular Responses to Tamoxifen Treatment in Polydimethylsiloxane-based Devices Compared to Normal Cell Culture

Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
Source:Journal of Chromatography B
Author(s): Lingyu Wang, Linfen Yu, Samantha Grist, Karen C. Cheung, David D.Y. Chen
Cell culture systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices offer great flexibility because of their simple fabrication and adaptability. PDMS devices also make it straightforward to set up parallel experiments and can facilitate process automation, potentially speeding up the drug discovery process. However, cells grown in PDMS-based systems can develop in different ways to those grown with conventional culturing systems because of the differences in the containers’ surfaces. Despite the growing number of studies on microfluidic cell culture devices, the differences in cellular behavior in PDMS-based devices and normal cell culture systems are poorly characterized. In this work, we investigated the proliferation and autophagy of MCF7 cells cultured in uncoated and Parylene-C coated PDMS wells. Using a quantitative method combining solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry we developed, we showed that Tamoxifen uptake into the surfaces of uncoated PDMS wells can change the drug’s effective concentration in the culture medium, affecting the results of Tamoxifen-induced autophagy and cytotoxicity assays. Such changes must be carefully analyzed before transferring in vitro experiments from a traditional culture environment to a PDMS-based microfluidic system. We also found that cells cultured in Parylene-C coated PDMS wells showed similar proliferation and drug response characteristics to cells cultured in standard polystyrene (PS) plates, indicating that Parylene-C deposition offers an easy way of limiting the uptake of small molecules into porous PDMS materials and significantly improves the performance of PDMS-based device for cell related research.

Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
Source:Journal of Chromatography B

Author(s): Lingyu Wang, Linfen Yu, Samantha Grist, Karen C. Cheung, David D.Y. Chen

Cell culture systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices offer great flexibility because of their simple fabrication and adaptability. PDMS devices also make it straightforward to set up parallel experiments and can facilitate process automation, potentially speeding up the drug discovery process. However, cells grown in PDMS-based systems can develop in different ways to those grown with conventional culturing systems because of the differences in the containers’ surfaces. Despite the growing number of studies on microfluidic cell culture devices, the differences in cellular behavior in PDMS-based devices and normal cell culture systems are poorly characterized. In this work, we investigated the proliferation and autophagy of MCF7 cells cultured in uncoated and Parylene-C coated PDMS wells. Using a quantitative method combining solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry we developed, we showed that Tamoxifen uptake into the surfaces of uncoated PDMS wells can change the drug’s effective concentration in the culture medium, affecting the results of Tamoxifen-induced autophagy and cytotoxicity assays. Such changes must be carefully analyzed before transferring in vitro experiments from a traditional culture environment to a PDMS-based microfluidic system. We also found that cells cultured in Parylene-C coated PDMS wells showed similar proliferation and drug response characteristics to cells cultured in standard polystyrene (PS) plates, indicating that Parylene-C deposition offers an easy way of limiting the uptake of small molecules into porous PDMS materials and significantly improves the performance of PDMS-based device for cell related research.